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Oocyte-specific deletion of furin leads to female infertility by causing early secondary follicle arrest in mice.


ABSTRACT: The process of follicular development involves communications between oocyte and surrounding granulosa cells. FURIN is a member of the family of proprotein convertases that is involved in the activation of a large number of zymogens and proproteins by cleavage at its recognition motif. To investigate the functions of FURIN in female fertility, furinflox/flox (furfl/fl) mice were crossed with Zp3-Cre mice and Gdf9-Cre, respectively, to achieve oocyte-specific disruption of FURIN. Here we report for the first time that FURIN is dispensable for primordial follicle maintenance and activation but important for early secondary follicular development, as ablation of FURIN in oocytes caused failure of follicle development beyond the type 4 and/or 5a follicles in mutant mice, resulting in increased number of early secondary follicles and the severely decreased number of mature follicles, thus anovulation and infertility. We also found that the developmental arrest of early secondary follicles might be rooted in the loss of the mature form of ADAMTS1 (85-kDa prodomain truncated) and compromised proliferation of granulosa cells in mutant mice. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of FURIN in follicle development beyond the early secondary follicle stage and indicate that compromised FURIN function leads to follicular dysplasia and female infertility in mice.

SUBMITTER: Meng TG 

PROVIDER: S-EPMC5520891 | BioStudies | 2017-01-01T00:00:00Z

REPOSITORIES: biostudies

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