Transcriptomics

Dataset Information

6

Transcription profiling of human Dendritic cells reveals inhibition of Chlamydia pneumoniae replication by TNF-alpha-Induced Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase


ABSTRACT: Infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, a human respiratory pathogen, has been associated with various chronic diseases such as asthma, coronary heart disease and importantly atherosclerosis. Possibly because the pathogen can exist in a persistent form. TNF-a has been reported to induce chlamydial persitence in epithelial cell lines, however the mechanism of TNF-a-induced persistence has not been reported. Moreover, C. pneumoniae persistently infect human dendritic cells (DCs) and activate DCs to produce cytokines including TNF-a. Induction of chlamydial persistence by other cytokines such as IFN-g is known to be due to indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity. The present study therefore, investigated whether C. pneumoniae infection can induce IDO activity in dendritic cells, and whether the restriction of chlamydial growth in the DCs by TNF-a is IDO-dependent. Our data indicate that infection of DCs with C. pneumoniae resulted in the induction of IDO expression. Reporting on our use of anti-TNF-a antibody adalimumab and varying concentrations of TNF-a, we further demonstrate that IDO induction following infection of DCs with C. pneumoniae is TNF-a-dependent. The anti-chlamydial activity induced by TNF-a and the expression of chlamydial 16S rRNA gene, euo, groEL1, ftsk and tal genes was correlated with the induction of IDO. Addition of excess amounts of tryptophan to the DC cultures resulted in abrogation of the TNF-a-mediated chlamydial growth restriction. These findings suggest that infection of DCs by C. pneumoniae induces production of functional IDO, which subsequently causes depletion of tryptophan. This may represent a potential mechanism for DCs to restrict bacterial growth in chlamydial infections. Experiment Overall Design: Human monocyte-derived DCs from five heathy donors were infected with C. pneumoniae at multiplicity of infection of 5 for 72 h. Mock-infected (uninfected) DCs were used as a control for the infection. Total RNA from 72 h chlamydiae-infected or mock-infected DCs was isolated with RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) and DNA contamination was removed with RQ1 DNase (Promega). Total RNA from all donors was pooled and the samples were processed and analyzed at the array facility of Helmholtz center for infection biology, Braunschweig. The integrity of the RNA was verified on the Agilent Bioanalyzer system. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome U133 2.0 Plus. Data were processed using Affymetrix software and signal intensity measured was normalized by the Affymetrix MAS5 algorithm. Data were filtered to exclude genes at background levels (non-expressors, signal intensity at 100).

ORGANISM(S): Homo sapiens  

SUBMITTER: Robert Geffers  

PROVIDER: E-GEOD-12806 | ArrayExpress | 2009-09-15

SECONDARY ACCESSION(S): GSE12806PRJNA111111

REPOSITORIES: GEO, ArrayExpress

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Publications

Restriction of Chlamydia pneumoniae replication in human dendritic cell by activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

Njau Florence F   Geffers Robert R   Thalmann Jessica J   Haller Hermann H   Wagner Annette Doris AD  

Microbes and infection 20090728 13


Infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, a human respiratory pathogen, has been associated with various chronic diseases such as asthma and atherosclerosis, possibly because the pathogen can exist in a persistent form. C. pneumoniae persistently infect DCs in a TNF-alpha dependent manner. The present study investigated whether C. pneumoniae infection can induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in dendritic cells, and whether the restriction of chlamydial growth in the DCs by TNF-alpha is I  ...[more]

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