Transcriptomics

Dataset Information

2

Colonization, luminescence, and autoinducer effects on host transcription during development of squid-vibrio association


ABSTRACT: The light-organ symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri offers the opportunity to decipher the hour-by-hour events that occur during the natural colonization of an animal's epithelial surface by its microbial partners. To determine the genetic basis of these events, a glass-slide microarray was used to characterize the light-organ transcriptome of juvenile squid in response to the initiation of symbiosis. Patterns of gene expression were compared between animals not exposed to the symbiont, exposed to the wild-type symbiont, or exposed to a mutant symbiont defective in either of two key characters of this association: bacterial luminescence or autoinducer (AI) production. Hundreds of genes were differentially regulated as a result of symbiosis initiation, and a hierarchy existed in the magnitude of the host's response to three symbiont features: bacterial presence > luminescence > AI production. Putative host receptors for bacterial surface molecules known to induce squid development are up-regulated by symbiont light production, suggesting that bioluminescence plays a key role in preparing the host for bacteria-induced development. Further, because the transcriptional response of tissues exposed to AI in the natural context (i.e., with the symbionts) differed from that to AI alone, the presence of the bacteria potentiates the role of quorum signals in symbiosis. Comparison of these microarray data with those from other symbioses, such as germ-free/conventionalized mice and zebrafish, revealed a set of shared genes that may represent a core set of ancient host responses conserved throughout animal evolution. Six experimental treatments of juvenile animals were performed for the microarray matrix: uncolonized (Apo); uncolonized, but supplemented with AI (Apo + AI); colonized by wild-type V. fischeri (wild type); colonized by a mutant defective in luciferase synthesis (luxA); colonized by a mutant defective in AI synthesis (luxI); and, colonized by the luxI mutant, but supplemented with AI (luxI + AI). At 18 h postinoculation, animals were anesthetized in 2% ethanol in HOSW, and the light organs were removed into RNAlater (Ambion Biosystems).

ORGANISM(S): Euprymna scolopes  

SUBMITTER: Bartley Joseph Brown  

PROVIDER: E-GEOD-13533 | ArrayExpress | 2008-11-10

SECONDARY ACCESSION(S): GSE13533PRJNA110085

REPOSITORIES: GEO, ArrayExpress

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Publications

Effects of colonization, luminescence, and autoinducer on host transcription during development of the squid-vibrio association.

Chun Carlene K CK   Troll Joshua V JV   Koroleva Irina I   Brown Bartley B   Manzella Liliana L   Snir Einat E   Almabrazi Hakeem H   Scheetz Todd E TE   Bonaldo Maria de Fatima Mde F   Casavant Thomas L TL   Soares M Bento MB   Ruby Edward G EG   McFall-Ngai Margaret J MJ  

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 20080805 32


The light-organ symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri offers the opportunity to decipher the hour-by-hour events that occur during the natural colonization of an animal's epithelial surface by its microbial partners. To determine the genetic basis of these events, a glass-slide microarray was used to characterize the light-organ transcriptome of juvenile squid in response to the initiation of symbiosis. Patterns of gene expression were compared  ...[more]

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