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A high yield optimized method for the production of acylated ACPs enabling the analysis of enzymes involved in P. falciparum fatty acid biosynthesis.


ABSTRACT: The natural substrates of the enzymes involved in type-II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) are acylated acyl carrier proteins (acyl-ACPs). The state of the art method to produce acyl-ACPs involves the transfer of a phosphopantetheine moiety from CoA to apo-ACP by E. coli holo-ACP synthase (EcACPS), yielding holo-ACP which subsequently becomes thioesterified with free fatty acids by the E. coli acyl-ACP synthase (EcAAS). Alternatively, acyl-ACPs can be synthesized by direct transfer of acylated phosphopantetheine moieties from acyl-CoA to apo-ACP by means of EcACPS. The need for native substrates to characterize the FAS-II enzymes of P. falciparum prompted us to investigate the potential and limit of the two methods to efficiently acylate P. falciparum ACP (PfACP) with respect to chain length and ?-modification and in preparative amounts. The EcAAS activity is found to be independent from the oxidation state at the ?-position and accepts fatty acids as substrates with chain lengths starting from C8 to C20, whereas EcACPS accepts very efficiently acyl-CoAs with chain lengths up to C16, and with decreasing activity also longer chains (C18 to C20). Methods were developed to synthesize and purify preparative amounts of high quality natural substrates that are fully functional for the enzymes of the P. falciparum FAS-II system.

SUBMITTER: Lauciello L 

PROVIDER: S-EPMC5613970 | BioStudies | 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z

REPOSITORIES: biostudies

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