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Increased aqueous autotaxin and lysophosphatidic acid levels are potential prognostic factors after trabeculectomy in different types of glaucoma.


ABSTRACT: We explored the potential relevance of aqueous lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and autotaxin (ATX) levels on postoperative outcomes of trabeculectomy, and the effects of ATX on fibrotic response in cultured human conjunctiva fibroblast (HCF) cells. We enrolled 70 glaucomatous eyes which underwent trabeculectomy, and quantified aqueous LPA and ATX. Those eyes were followed up for 12 months, and postoperative filtering blebs were evaluated using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Also, the ATX-induced fibrotic changes in HCFs and the effects of an ATX inhibitor were assessed. Measured aqueous ATX and LPA levels were significantly different between glaucoma subtypes. In multivariate analyses, aqueous ATX levels were significantly correlated with the presence of needlings at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Exfoliative glaucoma, whose ATX level was significantly high, showed significantly increased numbers of needlings and a lower cumulative success rate without needlings. An in vitro study showed that fibrotic changes were upregulated by ATX treatment in HCFs, which was significantly suppressed by an ATX inhibitor. We presently demonstrate that aqueous ATX may be a prognostic factor affecting the fibrotic response in HCFs and bleb formation, and inhibition of ATX could be a therapeutic target after trabeculectomy.

SUBMITTER: Igarashi N 

PROVIDER: S-EPMC6063955 | BioStudies | 2018-01-01T00:00:00Z

REPOSITORIES: biostudies

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