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Complete genome sequences of Streptomyces spp. isolated from disease-suppressive soils.


ABSTRACT:

Background

Bacteria within the genus Streptomyces remain a major source of new natural product discovery and as soil inoculants in agriculture where they promote plant growth and protect from disease. Recently, Streptomyces spp. have been implicated as important members of naturally disease-suppressive soils. To shine more light on the ecology and evolution of disease-suppressive microbial communities, we have sequenced the genome of three Streptomyces strains isolated from disease-suppressive soils and compared them to previously sequenced isolates. Strains selected for sequencing had previously showed strong phenotypes in competition or signaling assays.

Results

Here we present the de novo sequencing of three strains of the genus Streptomyces isolated from disease-suppressive soils to produce high-quality complete genomes. Streptomyces sp. GS93-23, Streptomyces sp. 3211-3, and Streptomyces sp. S3-4 were found to have linear chromosomes of 8.24 Mb, 8.23 Mb, and greater than 7.5 Mb, respectively. In addition, two of the strains were found to have large, linear plasmids. Each strain harbors between 26 and 38 natural product biosynthetic gene clusters, on par with previously sequenced Streptomyces spp. We compared these newly sequenced genomes with those of previously sequenced organisms. We see substantial natural product biosynthetic diversity between closely related strains, with the gain/loss of episomal DNA elements being a primary driver of genome evolution.

Conclusions

Long read sequencing data facilitates large contig assembly for high-GC Streptomyces genomes. While the sample number is too small for a definitive conclusion, we do not see evidence that disease suppressive soil isolates are particularly privileged in terms of numbers of biosynthetic gene clusters. The strong sequence similarity between GS93-23 and previously isolated Streptomyces lydicus suggests that species recruitment may contribute to the evolution of disease-suppressive microbial communities.

PROVIDER: S-EPMC6923854 | BioStudies |

REPOSITORIES: biostudies

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